It’s In The Writing: Combat “Scanners” by Getting to the Point Faster

You’ve written what you think is a solid 1,000 words on a topic in which you’ve an expert. It covers all the key points, you make all the arguments flawlessly, and you post it online where you normally post these sort of articles.

Too bad most of what you wrote will never get read — not because it wasn’t found online, but because people don’t read.

According to the consulting firm Nielsen Norman Group, readers only consume 20% of content on a page. That means only about 200 of your in-depth, thoughtful, priceless words will reach people’s eyes and brains (as for what’s comprehended and remembered, that’s a different issue altogether).

Given that readers only consume 20% of content on a page, what should you do to combat this?

You could write shorter, start with the most important information, or simplify the language. They’re all important, but I would argue the most important is the put the most important information first.

Here’s why: People don’t read online copy the same way they read books or magazines. They do what the website Econsultancy calls “scanning.” They scan the web page looking for the answer to their question. Usually, that question deals with a pain point: Can you solve my pain point? So, start with that I can solve your pain point.

I’m not saying the other two choices aren’t right answers, too. You could make the argument that all of the above is the best choice. Writing shorter increases the odds that more will be read, and using easy-to-understand words also keeps people reading.

So, write copy with scanners in mind. Start with the most important information first. Many people subscribe to this outline: This is what I’m going to tell you, this is me telling you, this is what I’ve told you.

But also consider some of Econsultancy’s tips: using descriptive headlines, bolding the most important info, making your headlines descriptive and to the point, and keeping the paragraphs to 1-2 sentences.

It is still possible to write compelling copy that’s brief and to the point. In fact, it’s becoming required. Make sure you can, or hire someone who can.

#people #content #consulting #readmore #leebarnathan #writing #writeshorter #avoidscanning

By |2022-07-25T18:20:37+00:00July 26, 2022|communication, Website, Writing|Comments Off on It’s In The Writing: Combat “Scanners” by Getting to the Point Faster

Website Writing Tip: Use Persuasive Marketing Tactics

Companies don’t understand that just because they know what they’re selling on their website will make people’s lives better doesn’t mean the website visitor knows. The copy has to be written in such a way that it leads the person to that conclusion. It has to be written in a way that stands out from all the other copy that’s out there. That means it has to be written from the website visitor’s perspective.

I recommend writing the copy using persuasive marketing, which is Interrupt, Engage, Educate, Offer.

Interrupt is your website headline that states the pain point. It’s often written as a question, though it doesn’t have to be.

Engage is where you promise the solution, but you don’t deliver it yet. It’s often a subhead on a website.

Educate is where you detail how you solve the pain point that you mentioned in the headline. You can mention your strengths, your uniqueness, your process.

Finally, with Offer, you give them something, ideally at no risk to them.

If you focus on them and not yourself, you will see an increase in how effective your website works. It will convert better, that is, the visitors will more likely heed your call to action, whatever that is.

I’d love to continue the discussion with you. Feel free to reach out by clicking on the Contact tab and we’ll set up a time to talk further.

By |2022-05-30T20:41:43+00:00May 30, 2022|Uncategorized, Website, Writing|Comments Off on Website Writing Tip: Use Persuasive Marketing Tactics

Website Writing Tip: Make it All About Them, Not You

When writing website copy, remember “It’s not me, it’s you.” Make sure that the copy is all about the people coming to the website looking to have their pain taken away. Make it all about them, make it honest and make it understandable.

Want proof? Consulting giant McKinsey did a study in which it surveyed 90 B2B companies and found that most of their clients and customers want open and honest dialogue. Also, CMO.com reported a study that said 79% of clients have to understand that the company cares about them before they consider buying from it.

So, not only does the copy have to be clear and understandable, it has to relate to the website visitors.

I’d love to continue the discussion with you. Feel free to reach out by clicking on the Contact tab and we’ll set up a time to talk further.

By |2022-05-30T20:42:17+00:00May 30, 2022|Uncategorized, Website, Writing|Comments Off on Website Writing Tip: Make it All About Them, Not You

Website Writing Tip: Focus on Pain Points

In researching for a recent presentation, I examined what must have been 100 websites, and something like 95% of them focused on the services they offered and not the pain points that visitors want to have solved. As you no doubt know, a feature is something a company offers; a benefit is something others get from using what the company offers.

People think that by listing everything the company does actually is solving the pain points. But all you’re really saying is “look at me, look at me! Look at everything I can do!” What website visitors really want is for you to answer the question, “What can you do for me?”

You have to remember that everyone is listening to their favorite radio station: WII-FM — What’s In it For Me. You have to be the program director and give the people what they want.

I’d love to continue the discussion with you. Feel free to reach out by clicking on the Contact tab and we’ll set up a time to talk further.

By |2022-05-30T20:42:59+00:00May 30, 2022|Uncategorized, Website, Writing|Comments Off on Website Writing Tip: Focus on Pain Points
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